San Marcos,
10
November
2015
|
11:28 PM
America/Los_Angeles

2015 California’s American Indian & Indigenous Film Festival Announces Line-Up

Eclectic lineup of films, documentaries and special guests showcase the finest work in current American Indian film and media, and spotlight American Indian lives, interests and issues.

The California Indian Culture and Sovereignty Center (CICSC) at California State University San Marcos (CSUSM) is pleased to present the California’s American Indian and Indigenous Film Festival (CAIIFF). Screenings will take place at CSUSM and at the Pechanga Resort and Casino in Temecula, Calif., Nov. 19-21.

The festival, formally known as the San Diego American Indian Film Festival, is now in its third year and is a grassroots community event organized by the CICSC in collaboration with its tribal and university partners. The CAIIFF is delighted to strengthen tribal cultural sovereignty in film, media and the arts by providing an accessible, fun, engaging and unique platform to showcase American Indian life, culture, history and stories about the lived realities American Indians face both past and present.

Located in the heart of southern California’s Indian country, the California Indian Culture and Sovereignty Center at Cal State San Marcos is the nexus for innovating partnerships between American Indians, academics and the regional community. The CAIIFF is a product of this innovation and has become a regional “don’t miss” event. Screenings are scheduled each year both at CSUSM and at the Pechanga Resort and Casino to literally bring the movies and moviegoers “home” to American Indian communities.

This year the CAIIFF offers an eclectic lineup of twenty films, shorts and documentaries, as well as a performance by the sketch comedy group, the 1491s and a youth track for 12 to 18-year-olds. Notable guests will include Peabody- and Emmy-award winning director/producer Chris Eyre; filmmaker Scott Garen; filmmaker Blackhorse Lowe; actress/producer/voice artist Irene Bedard; former professional football player/actor/producer/business owner Jim Warne; filmmaker Sterlin Harjo; artist/writer/director/humanitarian Steven Paul Judd and actor/master horseman/stuntman Rod Rondeaux. Tribal leaders and professionals from the region will also serve as moderators at many of the Q&A sessions.

All film festival events are open to the general public, with prices ranging from $5 to $7 per ticket available for purchase online. One hundred tickets are available for free to CSUSM students at the CICSC office. See schedule below for specific program details:

Thursday, Nov. 19 at 5:30 p.m. – “A Thousand Voices”

CSUSM—University Student Union, Ballroom

Executive Produced by Pamela Pierce of Silver Bullet Productions

Writer: Mara Dhu Studi

From the proverb, “It takes a thousand voices to tell a single story,” this is a documentary that builds from thousands of voices to present one universal story of New Mexico’s Native American women. Native American women have been purveyors of culture since creation. In spite of Western invasions, Native American women remain strong and grounded in traditional values by enduring courage and wisdom. The voices and advisers are from the Navajo Nation, Mescalero Apache Tribe, Jicarilla Apache Tribe, Kiowa Tribe, Pueblo de Cochiti, Ohkay Owingeh and Pueblos of Acoma, Laguna, Jemez, Santo Domingo, Pojoaque, Santa Clara, Taos, Nambe and San Ildefonso.

Thursday, Nov. 19 at 7:30 p.m. – “A Thousand Roads”

CSUSM—University Student Union, Ballroom

Director: Chris Eyre

Writer: Scott Garan and Joy Harjo

“Though we journey down a thousand roads, all our roads lead home.”

The lives of four Native Americans take a significant turn as they confront the crises that arise in a single day. A young Inupiat girl, a Navajo gangbanger, a Mohawk stockbroker and a Quechuan healer journey through the epic landscapes of Alaska, New Mexico, Manhattan and Peru, drawing strength from their tribal past to transcend the challenges of the day and embrace the promises that await them.

A Q&A session will follow the screening with director Chris Eyre, writer Scott Garen, and actress Irene Bedard.

Friday, Nov. 20 at 5:30 p.m. – “Chasing the Light”

CSUSM— University Student Union, Ballroom

Director/Writer: Blackhorse Lowe

Riggs, a depressed and struggling screenwriter in Albuquerque, New Mexico, begrudgingly goes with his drug-dealing friend, Many Goats, on a run that goes terribly wrong. A series of misadventures follows: bar fights, house parties, feuding couples and even a trip on the drug DMT. But none of these calamities can distract a dejected Riggs from his melodramatic thoughts of his ex-girlfriend. In this hilarious and dark film, Blackhorse calls on the rhythm of Slacker, the rich and sharp dialogue of Tarantino and the retro sensibility of Jim Jarmusch to create a unique and spectacular cinematic ride in his newest feature, scored by Nathan Young with music by Tenderizor, Lydell Mitchell, Toomuchloud and DE The Commoner. Appropriate for mature audiences.

A Q&A session will follow the screening with director/writer Blackhorse Lowe.

Friday, Nov. 20 at 7:30 p.m. – The Sketch Comedy Group, The 1491s

CSUSM— University Student Union, Ballroom

“Appropriate for Mature Audiences”

The 1491s are a sketch comedy group based in the wooded ghettos of Minnesota and buffalo grass of Oklahoma. They are a gaggle of Indians chock full of cynicism and splashed with a good dose of indigenous satire. They coined the term “All My Relations,” and are still waiting on the royalties. They were at Custer's Last Stand. They mooned Chris Columbus when he landed. They invented bubble gum. The 1491s teach young women to be strong and young men how to seduce these strong women.

Friday, Nov. 20 at 7:30 p.m. – World Premiere of “Goldilocks and the Bears”

CSUSM— University Student Union, Ballroom

Director: Zoe Hopkins

 “Appropriate for Mature Audiences”

A comedic adaptation of the children's classic, this version is more adult and entirely in the Mohawk language. With the theme of colonization at the core, this film has Goldilocks visiting the home of the bears, who have become more like humans than Goldilocks' own family.

Saturday, Nov. 21 at 1 p.m. –Youth Program facilitated by Steven Paul Judd

Pechanga Resort & Casino—Comedy Club

Opportunities for youth, 12 to 18 years old, include a Saturday afternoon shorts program, hosted by Artist, Filmmaker and Humanitarian Steven Paul Judd, featuring student films selected from the surrounding tribal community. Featured shorts include: The Child Who Hammered Nails, Footsteps, Malsem, Amazing, Crash Site, Viejas History, Mia’, Clouds of Autumn, First Contact, Ronnie BoDean, and Indian and the Tourist.

Saturday, Nov. 21 at 1:30 p.m. – 7th Generation

Pechanga Resort & Casino—The Show Room

Director: John L. Voth

Producers: John L. Voth, Sunshine Frank, Jim E Warne

This film covers generations of history, including the perspectives of Jim E Warne (Oglala Lakota) an advocate and educator. His story of the 7th Generation touches many levels of history and the unknown experiences of past generations. This documentary addresses historical and current perspectives from elders and community members with a focus on a positive future for our youth, the 7th Generation.

A Q&A session will follow the screening with producer/writer Jim E Warne.

Saturday, Nov. 21 at 3:00 p.m. – “Songs My Brothers Taught Me”

Pechanga Resort & Casino—The Show Room

Director: Chloé Zhao

With an older brother in jail and living with their single mother on Pine Ridge Reservation, Johnny and his sister Jashuan's lives develop new challenges when their absentee cowboy father suddenly dies. The loss prompts Johnny to strike out for Los Angeles, but would mean leaving behind his beloved sister.

A Q&A session will follow the screening with actress Irene Bedard.

Saturday, Nov. 21 at 7:15 p.m. – “Ronnie BoDean”

Pechanga Resort & Casino – The Show Room

Director: Steven Paul Judd

Ronnie BoDean (Wes Studi) is the ultimate anti-hero – hungover and streetwise, with a hustler’s heart of gold. When Ronnie faces his greatest challenge yet, babysitting his jailed neighbor’s precocious kid, the results are both hilarious and life-affirming.

Saturday, Nov. 21 at 7:15 p.m. – “Mekko”

Pechanga Resort & Casino – The Show Room

Director: Sterlin Harjo

“Appropriate for Mature Audiences”

Mekko gets out of prison after 19 years. He has no home or family so he makes his way to Tulsa, Oklahoma. He tries to connect with a cousin but she turns him away. With nowhere to go Mekko ends up sleeping on the streets. He is taken in by the homeless native community. At times jovial, there is a dark undercurrent to the community. He begins having issues with a man named Bill. Bill is pure evil. Convinced that this man is a witch, Mekko turns to the old teachings of his grandmother in order to rid the community of this witch. It's a story of redemption and hope. Mekko is in search of his home and the strength to forgive himself of his past.

A Q&A session will follow the screening with director Sterlin Harjo and lead actor Rod Rondeaux.

For more information contact:

Joely Proudfit, CSUSM, 760-750-3535, jproudfi@csusm.edu

Who: The California Indian Culture and Sovereignty Center (CICSC) at California State University San Marcos (CSUSM), and American Indian filmmakers, producers, directors and actors working throughout Indian Country

What: The California’s American Indian and Indigenous Film Festival (CAIIFF).

Why: To showcase the finest work in current American Indian film and media, and spotlight American Indian lives, interests and issues.

When: Thursday, Nov. 19 through Saturday, Nov. 21, 2015

Tickets: Purchase tickets online. Prices range from $5 to $7 per screening. One hundred tickets are available for free to CSUSM students at the CICSC office.

Where: Festival screenings and activities will take place Thursday, Nov. 19 and Friday, Nov. 20 at CSUSM, located at 333 S. Twin Oaks Valley Rd., San Marcos. For more information including driving directions, campus map and parking fees, visit the CSUSM Parking Guide.

Festival screenings and activities will take place Saturday, Nov. 21 at Pechanga Resort & Casino, 45000 Pechanga Parkway, Temecula. Parking is free. For driving directions, please visit the Pechanga Resort & Casino website.

About the California Indian Culture and Sovereignty Center

The California Indian Culture and Sovereignty Center is a welcoming place for students, faculty, staff and members of all tribal communities. Beautifully located on the campus of California State University San Marcos in the San Elijo Hills, the Center is housed in the Social and Behavioral Sciences Building. The CICSC fosters collaborative research and community service relationships between the faculty, staff and students at CSUSM and members of tribal communities for the purpose of developing and conducting research projects that support the maintenance of sovereignty and culture within those communities.
 

About California State University San Marcos

California State University San Marcos (CSUSM) is celebrating its 25th anniversary throughout the year of 2015. Since its founding, CSUSM has distinguished itself as a forward-focused institution, dedicated to preparing future leaders, building great communities and solving critical issues. With nearly 13,000 enrolled students, it is the only public four-year comprehensive university serving North San Diego and Southwest Riverside Counties.
 

Eighty-five percent of CSUSM’s nearly 35,000 alumni stay in the region after graduation. With approximately 2,000 employees, the institution is a Great College to Work For® (The Chronicle of Higher Education). As a recipient of the 2014 HEED Award—a national honor recognizing U.S. colleges and universities that demonstrate an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion—the University is committed to creating a diverse and inclusive environment. CSUSM is located on a 304-acre hillside overlooking the City of San Marcos. It is 15 miles east of the ocean; just 30 miles north of downtown San Diego.